An analysis of the main characters role in the lord of the flies by william golding

The fight for who will lead the island represents the clash between a peaceful democracy, as symbolized by Ralph, and a violent dictatorship, as symbolized by Jack. Ralph and Jack and the boys who align themselves with each represent different values and different aspects of human nature.

An analysis of the main characters role in the lord of the flies by william golding

He is attractive, charismatic, and decently intelligent. He demonstrates obvious common sense. Ralph is the one who conceives the meeting place, the fire, and the huts. He synthesizes and applies Piggy 's intellectualism, and he recognizes the false fears and superstitions as barriers to their survival.

He is a diplomat and a natural leader. Ralph's capacity for leadership is evident from the very beginning he is the only elected leader of the boys. During the crisis caused by the sight of the dead paratrooper on the mountain, Ralph is able to proceed with both sense and caution.

Symbolism in Lord of the Flies by William Golding

He works vigilantly to keep the group's focus on the hope for rescue. When the time comes to investigate the castle rock, Ralph takes the lead alone, despite his fear of the so-called beast. Even in this tense moment, politeness is his default.

When Simon mumbles that he doesn't believe in the beast, Ralph "answered him politely, as if agreeing about the weather. By the standards of the society he's left behind, Ralph is a gentleman.

Having started with a schoolboy's romantic attitude toward anticipated "adventures" on the island, Ralph eventually loses his excitement about their independence and longs for the comfort of the familiar.

He indulges in images of home, recollections of the peaceful life of cereal and cream and children's books he had once known. He fantasizes about bathing and grooming. As he gains experience with the assemblies, the forum for civilized discourse, he loses faith in them.

Over time, Ralph starts to lose his power of organized thought, such as when he struggles to develop an agenda for the meeting but finds himself lost in an inarticulate maze of vague thoughts.

An analysis of the main characters role in the lord of the flies by william golding

Ralph's loss of verbal ability bodes ill for the group because his authority lies in the platform, the symbol of collective governance and problem solving where verbal communication is the primary tool.

Ralph's mental workings are subject to the same decay as his clothing; both are frayed by the rigors of the primitive life. Yet in response to the crisis of the lost rescue opportunity, Ralph demonstrates his capacities as a conceptual thinker.

When "[w]ith a convulsion of the mind, Ralph discovered dirt and decay," he is symbolically discovering humankind's dark side. At the same time, he has learned that intellect, reason, sensitivity, and empathy are the tools for holding the evil at bay.

Ralph's awareness is evident when, realizing the difficulty of this lifestyle in contrast to his initial impression of its glamour, he "smiled jeeringly," as an adult might look back with cynicism on the ideals held as a youth. Although he becomes worn down by the hardships and fears of primitive life and is gradually infected by the savagery of the other boys, Ralph is the only character who identifies Simon's death as murder and has a realistic, unvarnished view of his participation.

He feels both loathing and excitement over the kill he witnessed. Once Ralph becomes prey, he realizes that he is an outcast "Cos I had some sense" — not just common sense but a sense of his identity as a civilized person, a sense of the particular morality that had governed the boys' culture back home.

When Ralph encounters the officer on the beach at the end of the book, he is not relieved at being rescued from a certain grisly death but discomforted over "his filthy appearance," an indication that his civility had endured his ordeal.

In exchange for his innocence, he has gained an understanding of humankind's natural character, an understanding not heretofore available to him:Lord of the Flies is written by famous contemporary novelists William Golding (), who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in Since its publication in , the novel has become the best sellers and has been studied in.

The first chapter of the novel, The Lord of the Flies, by William Golding is effective in establishing the characters, concerns and language for the remainder of the book, as well as introducing the main themes of the novel; that the problems in society are related to the sinful nature of man and good verses evil.

The four main characters in Lord of the Flies, by William Golding, each represent some aspect of mankind.. Ralph is the first character we meet, and from the beginning it is clear that he is. The Lord of the Flies - The name given to the sow’s head that Jack’s gang impales on a stake and erects in the forest as an offering to the “beast.” The Lord of the Flies comes to symbolize the primordial instincts of power and cruelty that take control of Jack’s tribe.

Analysis and discussion of characters in William Golding's Lord of the Flies. Lord of the Flies Characters William Golding. Homework Help and Robert—have minor roles in Lord of the Flies. Get free homework help on William Golding's Lord of the Flies: book summary, chapter summary and analysis, quotes, essays, and character analysis courtesy of CliffsNotes.

In Lord of the Flies, British schoolboys are stranded on a tropical island.

Characters in Lord of the Flies with Examples and Analysis